Shiny, bouncy straight hair has been the star of black hair care lines for decades. There are hundreds of commercials for do it yourself relaxers and perms featuring models with hair extensions or a full blown wig.

Does it make sense to promote hair products that are supposed to make your natural coils fuller and healthier with a head full of hair brought at your local beauty store? I have nothing against wigs or weaves at all.

Of course, we all wear our hair different ways whether it is permed, relaxed, hair extensions, or natural. Why aren’t there black hair commercials that showcase variety in black hair? Where are the commercials for natural hair care products?

With an explosion of natural hair you tube channels and blogs, I think it time to showcase natural hair products on our television screens because there is nothing wrong with our natural curls. It would be interesting to see our favorite natural hair mavens like Curly Nikki, Naptural85, Taren Guy, and Mae of Natural Chica in a hair care commercial to showcase real results of products.

The Coil Review, natural hair and lifestyle web magazine, is on the forefront of making mainstream culture support women of color that wear natural coils.

In January 2012, the magazine released a hair commercial to showcase the many images of natural beauty that we often do not see in hair care media.

In The Coil Review latest commercial, they examine the scene at a local beauty shop where most of the women look like the standard of beauty with straight, long tresses. In the end, the naturalista spy in the video reveals a new take on hair. Take a look below:

Black hair care companies, it’s time to include all types of hair in your advertising. Do not fear natural hair because we will never know if products actually work if you keep putting wigs and weaves on TV models.

Would you like to see black hair care commercials featuring women with natural hair? What do you think of The Coil Review commercial?

-Paulette Wilson

  • omfg

    yes i would like to see more natural in black hair commercials. but, this spot is not all that great. it’s a little weird. they need a better concept.

    sorry.

  • http://afrolistasandthecity.blogspot.com Vonmiwi

    Which do we want, the mainstream or black owned advertising agencies to feature television advertisements/commercials for women who wear their hair in the manner in which it grows? Why do we need for them(Caucasians I’m sure)to accept and approve our choices for defining our own choices. Advertising dollars are used to market to intended audiences during the viewers choices. Complaining about the lack of commercials intended for women who have made the choice to forego relaxers won’t do anything if consumers are still purchasing their products in which most of the haircare companies are no longer black owned. Thank God I’m not a product junkie!

    • omfg

      my understanding is that this article is about black owned hair companies putting forth images of natural haired women.

      this has nothing to do with whites. i think you’re conflating issues.

      i don’t think there’s anything wrong wit wanting black companies to do this. however, the author is putting the cart before the horse in that black hair companies do not really make money geared toward natural hair so there’s no need to market to us. many of them are not interested and really don’t want black women to go the natural route because there’s not so much money to be made is my guess.

  • http://www.besthairrelaxer.net Hair

    I think advertisers display what viewers want to see. Unfortunately, that seems to the hair that celeb models presents with silky straight hair or hair extensions etc… Having said that looks like there is a growing trend in people going natural and maybe in the future more and more media representation will reflect that. Being a hair stylist, people come to me for relaxing their hair but wanted a natual relaxer(?). All I say them, if you want to go natural, stop using relaxers and but some quality conditioners to tame the frizz.

    • So Over This Ish

      While you made some valid points, I feel compelled to say that making the switch to natural can be very difficult for some people…especially those of us who never quite learned how to take care of our own hair. There is more to it than simply stopping the use of relaxers and applying deep conditioners.

      My last relaxer was in November. I am biracial with long, thick, kinky hair. I don’t want to relax my hair ever again. But despite all the good information I have read on the Internet, I still don’t know what to do with my hair.

      Your advice sounds like it would only work for people who don’t have tightly coiled hair. My hair is a mix of 3c, 4a, and 4b. All the conditioner and oils in the world won’t fix the dryness. I don’t want to do the big chop either…I would rather transition. But I don’t want to wear braids. I don’t know how to braid anyway.

      I’m also tender-headed…I hated having my long natural hair combed as a child and I hate having my hair relaxed. What’s a girl to do? I’m jealous of women who can do their own hair and look fly!

      I wish I knew what to do. I want to be natural but I’m not sure I can do it. Other ladies with natural hair look so beautiful.

  • modern lady

    It’s very hard to find good products for natural hair care. You almost have to be a spy to get ‘the good stuff’ lol. But, I think there will come a point, soon, when hair care manufacturers will no longer be able to ignore the natural styles. Because they aren’t going anywhere, in my opinion.

    It’s about money. They believe everyone is still perming their hair, but I’d estimate there’s a good 25-30% who’ve given up on that completely.

    • So Over This Ish

      Your post gives me hope. A lot of people still relax their hair, especially where I live…but hopefully this will change.

      I worked with two natural-haired ladies a few years ago. One of them had the biggest Afro I’ve ever seen! It is uncommon to see natural hair in this neck of the woods, which is why I appreciate it even more.

      You really think it’s about 30% who have quit the relaxers? I hope so, because that could indicate a shift in the mentality that kinky hair is “bad”.

  • lala

    Its about the dollars ! How can you make the most amount of money by selling people stuff for things they do not naturallly have.

    Think about it it cost more money to transfer your hair into s type of hair you dont naturally have. Then to work with what your already have.

    The black hair companies have no incentive to promote natural hair products because that is not where the dollars are.

  • brownsugababy

    I feel like the natural hair products get promoted through outlets such as youtube and all of the natural blogs and forums out there. It seems to be working because my local Target can’t seem to keep the Kinky Curly products in stock! lLOL Ultimately isn’t it up to the companies that produce the products to make a commercial? I’m going to assume it costs milions of dollars to air a commercial on a major network. I’m pretty sure a lot of the newer natural product companies don’t have that kind of money to dish out right now. But on another note I have noticed a lot of curly and afro styles in commercials not related to hair care products. So I guess we can say there is some representation there.

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